Prostate Cancer Prognosis – Life Expectancy for Patients

Prostate cancer prognosis generally varies from person to person, and may be affected by the type of Prostate Cancer Treatment that is administered to the patient, as well as the general state of health that the patient is as at the time of commencement of the therapy.

The most important factor however in determining what the chances of survival are for a man who has just been diagnosed with prostate cancer is the stage of the cancer as at the time of diagnosis. This is partly why so much effort is placed on staging the Prostate Cancer disease; so that they can know how far the disease has spread (or metastasized) in the body of the patient, and thus decide on treatment while also having an idea of how well the patient might respond over the course of the intervention.

Early stage prostate cancer is not only treatable, but it is also curable, to the extent that there are excellent five year outcomes of patients treated with radical prostatectomy – prostate cancer surgery – or early stage radiation therapy.

According to the American Cancer Society, the survival rate for men treated for early stage disease at five years is almost a hundred percent; at then years also, it still stands at an impressive 93%, and at fifteen years it drops to 77%, which is not too bad considering that the man will likely be well stricken with age at this time anyhow.

The story with late stage disease is a different matter altogether. Perhaps the biggest matter to realize first and foremost is that advanced stage prostate cancer is not really so curable – it is treatable, but it cannot be really cured – so whatever treatments are ordered by the oncologist or urologist will likely be to provide palliative care to the said patient, and little else.

Rarely are advanced stage prostate cancer patients expected to live longer than three years, although that also is determined by how aggressive the cancer is, how extensively it has metastasized through the body, and how well the patient responds to therapy. There are actually men who have lived as long as eight years after the diagnosis and with proper care before eventually dying – and there are those (very few) who have lived even further than that, although the doctors would hardly acknowledge them, putting them down as anomalous instances, exceptions that prove the rule.

It might be possible to further extend life expectancy for such a patient, say certain published research reports, but that has not been confirmed. According to this finding, prostatectomy can double or even triple the survival rate for advanced prostate cancer, but as said, this claim is yet being studied and may take a few years before it becomes founded… or not. In the meantime, men with advanced prostate cancer may only look forward to… er, five years?

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